Category: Public History Matters

Musician Justin Robinson said of his band, Carolina Chocolate Drops, “Tradition is a guide, not a jailer. We play in an older tradition but we are modern musicians.” The statement prefaces the philosophy behind the band’s artistry. Yes, they play old-time music, but they are modern.  Their instruments are traditional, yet played with contemporary stylings.  They […]

Read more

“Anthropology demands the open-mindedness,” said social scientist Margaret Mead,” with which one must look and listen, record in astonishment and wonder . . . ” Understanding and appreciating our amazing social traditions–from how we bury our dead to how we prepare holiday meals together–is “doing anthropology.” At The Social Voice Project, we celebrate history and people […]

Read more

Whenever I talk to groups about my work recording veterans oral histories, I usually share a story about Mr. Donald Myers, a WWII Marine officer who led his troops through some of the most horrific combat in the South Pacific islands. Think of those old black & white war films from the islands. Flame-throwers, bayonets, […]

Read more

TSVP strongly encourages local historical societies and museums to engage history in real time by using digital media to document, preserve, interpret, and share what is happening in our communities–right now. Carpe diem! In our opinion, too many local history organizations are rear facing and fixated on a static past. We think these organizations can […]

Read more

The Social Voice Project is mentioned in the chapter, “Oral History for the Twenty-First Century,” alongside StoryCorps (Library of Congress, National Public Radio) and the internationally acclaimed Memoro Project as a significant public history program that captures, preserves, and shares the voices and stories of our local communities. In reaction, we respond: “TSVP began as […]

Read more