Category: Public History Matters

It is during our darkest moments that we must focus to see the light. ~Aristotle The recent high-profile arrest of New England Patriots owner Bob Kraft for soliciting prostitution raises awareness of an issue resonating in cities and towns across America—human trafficking. “This is not about lonely old men and victimless crimes,” said Florida State […]

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Teen magazines are usually filled with celebrity interviews, pop culture news, gossip, fashion tips, and other ephemera of interest to impressionable adolescents.  Since the 1940s people have speculated on whether such publications are beneficial or harmful to young people.  “The experience of reading teen magazines,” says John Douglas Bishop in Business Ethics Quarterly, “can result […]

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Public historians–those who preserve, interpret, and share our local history–have a responsibility not only to bring us the facts, but also to help us think more broadly and deeply about history. Today, the historians’ typical tool kit–old photographs, faded documents, stoic roadside markers, and boring “catalog of facts” history lessons–must include new ways of educating, […]

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Musician Justin Robinson said of his band, Carolina Chocolate Drops, “Tradition is a guide, not a jailer. We play in an older tradition but we are modern musicians.” The statement prefaces the philosophy behind the band’s artistry. Yes, they play old-time music, but they are modern.  Their instruments are traditional, yet played with contemporary stylings.  They […]

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“Anthropology demands the open-mindedness,” said social scientist Margaret Mead,” with which one must look and listen, record in astonishment and wonder . . . ” Understanding and appreciating our amazing social traditions–from how we bury our dead to how we prepare holiday meals together–is “doing anthropology.” At The Social Voice Project, we celebrate history and people […]

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